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Echo Morgan

  • NFT presenting at Ephemerisle

    July 25, 2022 | Posted By: | Art Protest · blog: film link · body-politics · News |
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    Non-interchangeable body

    July 19, 2022 | Posted By: | Art Protest · body-politics · Exhibitions |

    Virtual Post-Performence Exhibition

    Chapter Four: The non-interchangeable body
    Jamie and I made our first N(Non)F(Fungible)T(Tokens)

    https://opensea.io/assets/ethereum/0xa3f7110208ba9699bb7815b7a59147a37f415d42/1/

    Become Little Plum Blossom NFT captured the #bodypaint preparation for my latest performance: Chinese Knot, which took place at the Non-fungible Body festival in Linz, Austria. OÖ Kunst
    To mint this #timelapse as our first NFT is a symbolic #gesture to keep Xiao Hua Mei (Little Plum Blossom) and #herstory alive, when so many in #China have been silenced.The process of body-painting transformed my body into an intermediate space of #social, #political, and #artisticexpression. This pre-performance action is the passage between my life and art.
    In 2020, a mother of eight children locked up in an iron chain captivated the attention of many people in and outside China. Her story is beyond a tragic #humantrafficking case. She was named: Xiao Hua Mei (Little Plum Blossom) by the Chinese authorities despite much controversy and disagreement.

    Can #DNA be fake?
    Can #identity be traded?
    Can 1.4 billion people save one woman?
    Can the internet’s hottest topic break the #censorship wall?
    Silenced, jailed, disappeared, delete, remove, forget …

    The role of translation, the passage between gesture, body and voice. My name is #XieRong ( Thank you Rose) I am a live action artist. I graduated with a #printmaking MA from the Royal College of Art what my course introduced and allowed me to explore was printmaking As #theworkofartintheageofmechanicalreproduction . Since 2011, I have been collaboration with my husband Jamie Baker on photographic interventions within my performance work. We wish to build a Performative Body that push the boundaries beyond live and documentations, web2 and #web3, #virtual and the real.
    OpenSea
    Thank you Freda Iala and River Lin, Alfred Weidinger for this exciting project and introduced us into the #blockchain.
    #art #artmarket #copyright #NFT #aura #authenticity #ritual #fineartNFT #performanceNFT #VoiceNFT #bodyNFT #LiveNFT

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    Be the Inside of the Vase

    July 7, 2022 | Posted By: | blog: film link · News |

    10 years since the make of Be the Inside of the Vase. The film will be screening at The Third Festival of Chinese Video Artists at the Cine Morelos Cinema, Cuernavaca Mexico. It as a parallel activity in their own Violet Green Festival. Feminisms in Morelos. Thanks to Curator and longtime supporter Elizabeth Rose.

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    🪢结🪢

    June 27, 2022 | Posted By: | Art Protest · blog: film link · body-politics · Live Performance · News |

    第一章:变成小花梅

    Chinese Knot, chapter one:

    Become “Little Plum Blossom”

    Our names are not Jane Doe. 

    An alias is our last defence. 

    Sensational title on the society page, photos with mosaic cover our eyes … 

    In the past 6 months, a mother of eight children locked up in an iron chain has captivated the attention of many people in and outside of China. It is beyond a tragic human trafficking case.

    There are many twists and turns in the narrative. After huge public outrage authorities in China’s Xuzhou city issued 5 statements and named Chained Mother as “Xiaohuamei: “ Little Plum Blossom – a woman was sold three times from south-western Yunnan province to Feng county. But is she truly her?

    Can DNA being fake? Can identify be swap?Can 1.4 billion people save one woman?Can the internet hottest topic break the censorship wall? When is the systematic structure of rape fall? Is this horrific tragedy only happens in China? Are we truly protected in so-call more civilized city? Religion, morality, tradition, custom, politics and law, why everything over powering a woman’s choice roar! 

    Silenced, Jailed, Disappeared…

    Delete, Remove, Forget …

    Opening act at The Non-fungible Body performance Festival, Linz, Austria

    Directed by Alfred Weidinger 

    Curated by Freda Fiala and River Lin

    4 hours body painting Captured by Jamie Baker

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    The Non-fungible Body

    May 28, 2022 | Posted By: | Live Performance · News · Press |

    Painting until it Becomes Marble, Leipzig 2019

    Photo by Jamie Baker

    Bodies Assert Themselves in the Digital: The “West” makes its own images of China, and the Internet plays along diligently. The Chinese Xie Rong performs in Linz. © Jamie Baker

    les-nouveaux-riches Magazine Interview: The Non-fungible Body?

    Xie Rong, Chinese Knot. Photo: Nurith Wagner-Strauss

    Linz has a new performance festival: THE NON-FUNGIBLE BODY – Performance and Digitalization. It brings together artists who address the cultural significance of live performance in the (post) pandemic era.Curated by Freda Fiala & River Lin. Participating artists: Cibelle Cavalli Bastos, Marita Bullmann, Yun-Chen Chang, Beatrice Didier, Jan Hakon Erichsen, David Henry Nobody Jr, Sara Lanner, Sajan Mani, Boris Nieslony, Yiannis Pappas, Jianan Qu, Xavier Le Roy, Sarah Trouche, Xie Rong

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    Cut Piece 2022: This Room Moves at the Same Speed as the Clouds

    May 27, 2022 | Posted By: | blog: film link · body-politics · Live Performance |

    This Room Moves at the Same Speed as the Clouds 

    I arrived in Zurich on the 7th of April in a storm. There were Ukraine flags flying in the old town. I checked with my Israeli friends safety as the shooting in the downtown Tel Aviv that night killed 3 and injured few … ShangHai has entered full scale lockdown, 25 million people are experiencing the world toughest restrictions … I watched the clouds rushing cross River Limmat, I thought, how would people react to the Cut Piece in the time of the pandemic and a war in Europe? 

    Here are some my experience of the Cut Piece 2022: 

    1. The performance last 2 and half hours finished by museum turned down the lights as the security guards need to go home. You could say it was an open ending, waves of actions, strong opposite responding.  
    • Dust of fabric, I don’t remember seeing such poignant fragment in the last Cut Piece.  
    • Whisper, 5 Chinese speaking audiences said: “Thank you”, “ Sister”, “I am sorry” … to me in soft and gentle tone, It made my eyes moist almost instantly.   
    • A little girl came at lest 3 times, she collected different pieces from every parts of my outfit, to me she was making a map, she seemed happy and enjoying the participation. Took my instruction as an offer, a gift. Her movement around my body created poetic dance like the passing cloud.  
    • A little boy came with his mother, dressed in yellow jacket and blue hat, it reminded me Yoko Ono’s The Blue Room Event which is where the exhibition title from: This room moves at the same speed as the clouds. This room slowly evaporates every day. Stay until the room is blue… 
    • Some audiences were challenging the concept of “Taking” Someone didn’t cut but simply changed the direction of the scissors; Two people cut their own shirt and placed the small fabric in my hand; Someone kneeled down and stared into my eyes; Someone hugged me; Someone wiped my tears away; Someone sang, Someone cried … Two young women took their own clothes off to cover me while someone strip everything off … Someone walked away with the scissors, someone brought it back … the performance continues very slowly and silently. The 

    stage became an opening book … echoes Yoko’s words: “Many rooms, many dreams, many countries in the same space. — The Blue Room Event ” 

    • One point, I had two jackets and three coats on, five people sat around me, I thought if all audience came up to the stage what a grand statement that is! “world will live as one.”  

    • Historically Yoko amended the instructions a couple of times: indicating that “members of the audience may cut each other’s clothing. The audience may cut as long as they wish.”  All the gestures happened during this Cut Piece naturally. Also it seems at times people were also recreating “Touching Piece” and “ Half A Wind” to my outfit.  
    • Four people wrote to me after the performance, asking my thoughts also sharing their experience, what a generous concept of live art, taking and adding, sharing and exchanging! The relationship between performer and participants. It rises questions about power and control.  
    1. I went back to the hotel with three piece of fabrics and a feather in my hair, a small bleeding cut and one shoe. Like my audiences, I also had souvenirs from this Cut Piece 2022.

    Finally, I like to quote Kevin Concannon conclusion from his essay: Yoko Ono’s CUT PIECE: From Text to Performance and Back: Readings of Cut Piece as feminist, pacifist, anti – authoritarian, Buddhist, Christian – and even as a striptease – are all valid. The many and varied interpretations of Cut Piece by artist, performers, audiences, and critics testify to the work’s great power – a power embedded in its score. But most importantly, Cut Piece is an incredibly rich and poetic work that poses seldom – asked questions about the nature of art itself and in the process opens itself up to a multitude of readings. To assert that any of its performances or interpretations are definitive denies the work the very multivalence at its core and minimizes the qualities that make it forever vital and alive.

    Live Performance at KunsthausZurich

    Photo by Nelly Rodriguez

    Video by Andri Weidmann

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    Cut Piece 2022

    May 22, 2022 | Posted By: | Art Protest · blog: film link · Live Performance · News |

    The Outfits 🕊

    I choose to wear white because it’s world peace sentiment and most importantly I was imaging as the performance goes, the energy and the shift of missing piece creates abstract clouds just like the exhibition title: This room moves at the same speed as the clouds. I wanted to in-body the cloud. ☁️

    My outfit was combined with newly bought items: tights, underwear and jacket and my own loved designer clothes: shirt, skirts and shoes but this time I made a decision not to wear European Union heritage brands. I didn’t want to have the concept of “cutting” related to them because of the Russian-Ukraine war and Brexit. Still I wanted to offer my best outfit also most recognisable classic brands that has their own social identity and global expansion and influence. Here are some of my thinkings:

    Jacket: Ralph Lauren ( one of the oldest American luxury brand based in New York, many people would considered it as the icon of American/Western lifestyle.) 

    Shirt: Vivienne Westwood, UK brand ( “The mother of punk” Vivienne Westwood is also an Eco fashion campaigner, social injustice activist, consumerism ideologist. ) 

    Skirt: Alexander McQueen, UK brand: ( This was a vintage piece designed by Lee McQueen himself, who has a vision to “create armor for women”. To wear that to cover my bottom because both myself and Lee has experienced abuse from childhood. ) for me, Lee’s proud queer identity, HIV positive status, drugs use and tragic suicide makes him one of the most complex icon of our time. 

    Underwear: Calvin Klein ( one of the most iconic cultural symbol of body and branding. In 2020, Calvin Klein made a statement to cut ties with any factories or mills that produce fabric or use cotton from Xinjiang by 2021 due to human rights Al campaigners say, the cotton are produced by Xinjiang’s Uighur minority forced labour. ) 

    Tights: Wolford ( This was the only European brand I used for it’s second skin feel and intimate last protection concept ) 

    Shoes: Manolo Blahniks: ( It’s a pair of very classic heel. Many used as symbol of modern femininity, often used as feminist statement in  soap opera such as: Sex and The City. 

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    Gifts for the River Film Festival

    March 26, 2022 | Posted By: | Academic Research · Art Protest · blog: film link · Eco Art |

    Journey with Water, Betsy Damon in China

    Film screening on the March 25th, 2022 at Central Michigan University

    Gifts For The River Film Festival seeks to celebrate our relationship with the land and waterways that sustain us. To celebrate the artists and filmmakers who are in intentional relationship with the natural world and utilize their medium to create awareness about the issues that threaten Mother Earth as well as celebrate the ongoing resilience of Turtle Island and the peoples who care for it.

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    The Radical Outdoors

    March 4, 2022 | Posted By: | Academic Research |

    Betsy Damon’s feminist performances and eco-justice collaborations in the U.S. and China

    • Friday, March 4, 2022
    • 12:00 PM  1:30 PM

    Session The Radical Outdoors: Betsy Damon’s feminist performances and eco-justice collaborations in the U.S. and China
    Chairs: Monika Fabijanska, Independent Art Historian and Curator
    Dr. Christine A. Filippone, Millersville University
    2022 College Art Association Annual Conference
    Friday, March 4, 2022, 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM (online only)

    Presenters:

    Monika Fabijanska, Independent Curator
    Out In the Open: Betsy Damon’s Street Performances and Transnational Social Practice
    Petra Poelzl, Independent Researcher, Vienna, Austria
    The reception and impact of Betsy Damon’s Keepers of the Waters in China (1995) and Tibet (1996)
    Dr. Christina Filippone, Millersville University, US
    From Social Justice to Eco-Justice: Feminist Collaboration in the Work of Betsy Damon
    Rong Xie, Independent Artist, London UK
    A Journey with Water: Betsy Damon in China

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    Masking “Chineseness”

    February 11, 2022 | Posted By: | Academic Research |

    The Performance Works of Xie Rong 谢蓉 (Echo Morgan)

    By Freda Fiala

    As part of the conference series on “Women and Masks” at Boston University, I am glad to present my long-term research on performance artist Xie Rong 谢蓉 (Echo Morgan) for the first time.

    The performances of Xie Rong 谢蓉 (Echo Morgan) engage with Masks and Maskings as strategies of a strong contemporary female artistic expression. Born in Chengdu in 1983, Xie Rong’s studies have taken her to the UK, where she currently lives and works. Looking at Chinese culture from a diasporic perspective, her performances focus mainly on her family history in relation to the political history of modern China. She uses both physical Masks as well as various strategies of Masking her skin, which highlight the body both as a place for the projection of transcultural phantasy and as a site of power struggle. Contextualising the case study of Xie Rong, the presentation takes a conceptual approach, to understand her artistic engagement with Masks and Maskings as a ‘method’ of corporeal investigation and as ambitious intercultural articulation.

    Freda Fiala is a writer working across the contexts of performance art, new media dramaturgy and interculturalism, through researching and curating. She is a fellow of the Austrian Academy of Sciences and currently pursues a PhD on contemporary performance practices in East Asia. She studied Theater and Chinese Studies in Vienna, Berlin, Hong Kong and Taipei. Her research interests mainly include cultural diversity, cross-cultural exchange and ‘actionable speculations’ in the age of digitalisation.

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    Sea 海 ~ Xie Rong

    January 12, 2022 | Posted By: | blog: film link · Exhibitions · Hong Kong |

    Xie Rong and Jamie Baker ‘Sea 海’ Jeju Island, South Korea, 2019
    Xie Rong and Jamie Baker ‘Sea 海’ Jeju Island, South Korea, 2019

    Sea

    Performance by Xie Rong
    Photo by Jamie Baker

    I like to say, I am the daughter of the ocean, I like to say that I grew up in the sea … but that’s a lie, I can’t swim and I am terrified of water. I first saw the sea when I was 11 years old, my dad took me to Hainan, it was the only time I traveled with him, growing up with my single mum, she described him as: “The Sailor! He is drifting in the yellow river.” For many years this metaphor painted a vibrant and romantic image of my never-homed father. He used to say he won’t become my burden and he will die young, at 60 years old he will jump off a cliff and hug the ocean. My father did die at 60 years old, not by the cliff, not in the sea but in an empty flat, alone, starving, and frozen to death.

    The Chinese word “Sea” constructed in three parts: water, human, and mother. It’s a word about bodies. bodies of humans, bodies of nature. Bodies of individuals and social emotions.

    2019, I traveled to Sydney and South Korea, and Finland to perform about the Sea. I collected personal stories and collaborate with local musicians, Subjects spread crossed: family, loss, grief, migration, border and climate crisis.

    Just like the sea itself, so close to everyone’s life, deep in everyone’s memory. Even for someone like me who doesn’t even swim.

    謝蓉的行為
    傑米的照片

    我想說,我是海的女兒,我想說,我在海中長大……但這是個謊言,我不會游泳,我害怕水。我11歲那年第一次見到大海,父親帶我去了海南,那是我唯一一次和他一起旅行,我跟媽媽長大,她曾經形容那從不歸家的爸爸:“他是長漂運動員!他現在又去黃河漂流了。”多年以來,這個玩笑浪漫生動的描繪了我父親的形象。爸爸曾經說他不會成為我的負擔,他會死得很年輕,到60歲時,他會沿懸崖跳下,擁抱大海。我父親確實在60歲那年去世,但並非鄰海而安,他死在一個空蕩蕩的公寓裡,眾叛親離,飢寒而終。

    “海”字由三個部分組成:水,人和母。這是一個關於身體的詞。人類的身體,自然的身體。個體與群體的情感記憶。

    2019年,我在澳大利亞,韓國和芬蘭進行了關於“海”的行為表演。我收集了個人故事,並與當地音樂家合作,主題交織著關於:家庭,失落,悲傷,移民,国界和氣候危機。

    海洋就是這樣神奇,如此接近每個人的生命,她深深地存在於每個人的記憶中。即使對於像我這樣一個旱鴨子。


    Xierong&Jamiebaker.JPG

    Xie Rong appropriates contemporary of Chineseness, and tropes of Chinoiserie and femininity in order to subvert them. Utilising her own body as material, she often works with text written on her skin using red lipstick, black Chinese ink, white ‘ink’ made from jasmine tea, or her own breast milk after giving birth to her second child. She mines her own experiences of childhood, family, marriage and motherhood – and those of her female ancestors – juxtaposing English narration with Chinese traditional folk song to play with her complex hybrid identity. Her work explores the territory of translation: between two languages, between gesture and stillness, between her Chinese past and English present, between performance and image. Xie Rong studied at the Sichuan Fine Arts Institute High School before moving to London, where she gained a BA in Graphic Design at Central Saint Martins and an MA in Fine Art at the Royal College of Art. Her work has been seen in the United States, United Kingdom, France, China, Sweden, Egypt, Germany, Australia and Korea, Finland, Mexico and Iran . She won 40 under 40 perspective art award in 2017 and the China Arts Now Award 2019. Since 2011, She has been collaborating with photographer Jamie Baker on photographic interventions within her performance work.

    謝蓉创造出當代的 “中國”的印象,通过对傳統 “中國風”和“女性形象”的塑造來顛覆它們。她利用自己的身體作為材料,曾使用口红,母乳,泥土等材料在皮膚上繪畫和書寫。她挖掘自己的童年回憶,家庭和婚姻。以及她的女性祖先的經歷。將英語敘事與中國80年代的流行歌曲並列,以發揮其複雜的混合身份。她的作品探索翻譯的領域:兩種語言之間,暗示和靜止之間,她在中國的過去和英語環境的現在,在表演和圖像之間。謝蓉移居倫敦之前,曾在四川美術學院附中學習,在倫敦她獲得了中央聖馬丁學院平面設計學士學位和皇家藝術學院美術碩士學位。她的作品曾在美國,英國,法國,中國,瑞典,埃及,德國,澳大利亞和韓國,芬蘭,墨西哥和伊朗展出。她在2017年獲得了40歲以下40歲以下人士的透視藝術獎,並在2019年獲得了中國當代藝術獎。自2011年以來,她一直與攝影師Jamie Baker合作, 紀錄行為作品。

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    Disaster

    November 30, 2021 | Posted By: | blog: film link · body-politics · covid19 |

    Film screening at Deformes Triennial First International Triennial of Performance Deformes, Chile, 2021

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    Solo Exhibition Opening

    November 7, 2021 | Posted By: | body-politics · Exhibitions · News |

    Xie Rong. “The place where I yearn is day and night.” 
    Ramat Gan Museum of Russian and Far Eastern Art. 
    From November 11, 2021 
    Exhibition curated by Adiya Porat

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    The Place Where I Miss Day and Night

    November 7, 2021 | Posted By: | body-politics · Exhibitions · News · Press |

    Solo Exhibition, at the Museum of Far Eastern Art . An exhibition that includes a selection of video performances, as well as video art and photographs.

    By maska

    Posted on 07.11.2021

    Xie Rong: The Place Where I Miss Day and Night, Photographs of works – ©  Jamie Baker 

    Xie Rong, a Chinese-born contemporary artist, specializes in performance and video art. Her work, born from a hybrid complex self-awareness, balances between tradition and modernity. The artist tells about the personal, translating her stories into the language of performance, recites texts in English, and sings traditional Chinese songs. Xie Rong uses the technique of homage and silence, indicating his presence, powerful and fragile at the same time. The artist uses her influence on the public, involving the audience in her own performance.

    Xie Rong’s narrative is based on her family history. In her works, she shares memories of her childhood in the city of Chengdu in the Sichuan region, talks about her relatives and the ancestors of her family. The personal memories that the artist explores are based on the deep traditions of a complex Chinese society undergoing ideological, political, economic and social changes.

    Xie Rong analyzes the stereotypes associated with China, fights against them and opposes them. He paints his body with classical Chinese cultural symbols, mimicking either blue-and-white porcelain or classical Chinese landscapes and calligraphy, giving new meaning to traditional Chinese painting. With her art, she “translates” traditional classical Chinese art into modern language, adapting it to modern Western perception.

    Xie Rong’s work is influenced by Western performance artists of the 1960s and 70s. In those years, performance included an exploration of the capabilities of the human body, a test of physical and mental endurance and stamina. Shi Rong, using voice, body, symbolic images and personal texts, examines the relationship between such human manifestations as cruelty, beauty, vulnerability, trying to understand how all this together affects the formation of self-awareness and the feeling of one’s own body. Shows traditional Chinese art through a modern view from the side – from Europe, using both sound and traditional Chinese symbols – for example, a goldfish, concepts from Chinese philosophy.

    Often, Xie Rong invites the audience to take an active part in her performances, drawing strength from the vulnerable position in which the audience finds themselves and the discomfort experienced by the participants in the show. The emotions of the audience are intertwined with the feelings of the artist, which allows her to build a certain model of relationships, which is a holistic performance.

    The creative cycle of actions of the artist and the audience, the inextricable link between the past and the future, between traditional cultural baggage and contemporary art echoes the principle of Buddhist samsara: the cycle of birth and death, growth and decay, death and rebirth.

    Xie Rong (1983) was born in Chengdu, China. She attended art school in Sichuan, where she studied classical drawing and calligraphy, at the age of 19 she left to continue her studies in London, where she received her first academic degree in graphic design from the Central Saint Martins College of Art (CSM) and the second academic degree in art from the Royal College of Art. Lives and works in London and Surrey. Participated in solo and group exhibitions in Hong Kong, Australia, China, Sweden, Germany and England. Her husband, photographer Jamie Baker, helps her in her work.

    *****

    Xie Rong. “The place where I yearn is day and night.” 
    Ramat Gan Museum of Russian and Far Eastern Art. 
    From November 11, 2021 – May 2022
    Exhibition curated by Adiya Porat

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    Harbinger Exhibition

    November 1, 2021 | Posted By: | Art Protest · blog: film link · body-politics · Exhibitions · Live Performance · Press |

    Film screening at Harbinger

    Harbinger – create a physical and digital exhibition about marginalised communities dealing with the climate crisis in line with COP26 which is on the 1st -12th November 2021.

    The exhibition also showcases the stories of artists and how they and their art have been affected, as a result. These stories are married with recorded interviews with a leading dermatologist consultant explaining the effects of chemical treatments on the hair and skin, and parallel recorded interviews with soil scientists from renowned international universities showing the effects of chemical treatments on the soil, wildlife, plants, and the effect as these chemicals make their way down through the earth to the water table. This is an integral part of the exhibition and a curatorial decision to marry the emotional and scientific elements to powerfully show the impact on marginalised women’s skin and hair and the impact on the earth’s skin.

    There will be photographic examples of biodiversity due to hair chemical treatments being invested within the soil. Finally, archival materials showcasing historical evidence of the creation of mass chemical treatments because of profit from white cis man-made industries.

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    I Would Like to Know You

    October 30, 2021 | Posted By: | Art Protest · body-politics · Exhibitions · Live Performance |

    Conversation with Duan Ying Mei about my performance art as part of her exhibition in Garage Museum of Contemporary Art

    The performative Body 

    Photos by Jamie Baker

    1.Little Red Flower

    ‘My earliest performative act was put my hand at 90 degree angle whenever I need to speak.’ In this performance, I reflected on my childhood communist education by covering my body with branded red lipsticks.

    2.Be the Inside of the Vase

    Through brutal personal history I addressed sexually political statements from my mother: ‘Don’t be a vase, pretty but empty inside, be the inside of the vase!’ 

    3.Balls of steel

    Come to tingle my rusty bell, I will sing for you, I will tell you a story… 5hours spontaneous storytelling performance. 

    4.Three Cannon Balls

    A head, two fists covered by sticky rich balls. Three sauce labeled aside: brown sugar/communist education, soya powder/culture heritage, sesame seeds/western education. Audiences were invited to dress me with a chose of sauce.

    5.Mountain and Water

    Faced with the failure of the human order, learned men sought permanence within … the mountains to find a sanctuary from the chaos of dynastic collapse.

    6.Home

    家 (Jia) means Home, also my mother’s middle name. She was born 1957, her life story meets every changing political event in modern Chinese history.

    7.Delete

    From age 4-7, I lived in a boarding communist nursery. June 1989, I was not able to go home for one month . Teacher gave all the students one little red flower a day as an emotional comfort. During this performance, I slapped myself… until the Chinese characters fell into powder.

    8.Painting until it becomes marble
    10days after my mother in law’s death, I painted a picture with my hair. Sorrow and grief transformed into lines and splashes, recorded my profound feeling of loss.

    9.Part of a Lighthouse

    Faced painted Chinese character “光” : Light. 12 words were should out.12 ropes threw from 12 spaces, dragged between audiences, I built a light house inside the museum.

    10.Story of the Stone

    For all the people that suffered in domestic violence, for all the women that were forced into a mad house, for all the children that were victims of elder abuse … I was buried inside 3tones of stones up to my rib cage, audience are invited to remove them.

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    Ellipsis Print

    October 20, 2021 | Posted By: | Press |

    Love Wild Lawn, 2021

    Risograph print on Olin natural white 170gsm paper

    42 x 29.7 cm (A3)

    Limited edition of 100
    purchase from Ellipsis Website

    This limited edition print is made from layers of wild flowers and weeds from our lawn. The character written across my face reads: Love. If the lawn is a symbol of status and a sign of pride and unity in the community, I truly wish our love for a manicured lawn can be more inclusive by allowing it to grew higher and more wild.

    Risograph was born in Japan in the 1980s I used the scanning process for my face layer and all the available riso ink from @londonbookarts which are made from environmentally friendly soybean 🌱can you see the life journey contains in each dots? ♻️

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    Reframing Narrative

    October 19, 2021 | Posted By: | Art Protest · covid19 · Press |

    What not to miss during Frieze Week 2021

    Bazaar presents the ultimate guide to London’s annual celebration of art

    Rewriting the narrative

    Join Helena Lee, acting deputy editor of Harper’s Bazaar and founder of East Side Voices, in conversation with three of the brightest East Asian artists working in Britain today: Xie Rong, Vivien Zhang and Kristy Chan. They will cover everything from finding strength in their artistic voice during the pandemic, to breaking boundaries with their cultural vision. Expect an evening of frank conversation about staying true to yourself and to your art form.

    Rewriting the narrative: British East Asian artists, Shoreditch House, 7pm on 14 October. Non-member link: https://www.sohohouse.com

    + Read more…

    I would like to know you

    October 9, 2021 | Posted By: | Academic Research · Art Protest · blog: film link · Exhibitions |

    Conversation with DuanYingMei for

    Spirit Labor: Duration, Difficulty, and Affect

    Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow

    10 Sep 2021-30 Jan 2022

    Lawn Are an Ecological Disaster, Are you surprised?

    This year I have been researcher on the history of Lawn. Reflecting on the social and environmental impacts of Lawns, family roots, man occupied space, collective memories, native species beyond human centred perspectives. How visionary plans for the city can be sustainable for generations to come.

    Portrait 爱LOVE is made from layers of wild flowers and weeds from our lawn. The character written across my face reads: Love. If the lawn is a symbol of status and a sign of pride and unity in the community, I truly wish our love for a manicured lawn can be more inclusive by allowing it to grew higher and more wild.

    Film: TianFu Lawn: Keep off the Grass
    In early 90s, my father’s business was declining. He borrowed money from his friends and family to invest in properties. A trusted the contact in the government, shared a secret business opportunity. Chengdu is redesigning its city centre on Ren Min south road, where the imperial city was demolished during the Cultural Revolution. My father can invest in one real estate and turn it into a shop front. This seems to be a golden opportunity to change his life, he dreamed excitedly the future customers spending fortune on his merchandise in the middle of this heavenly city centre. One year later, the reality was unexpected and cruel. This city centre square that many people was waiting for was 88000 square meters of lawn. Lawn does not grow well in China so for the next 24years, “Keep Off the Grass” has become a symbol for a civilised city. Together with ground-breaking urban modernisation, our motherland has transformed from mountains and water, villages and gardens to forests of irons and concretes decorated by manicured and not so evergreen turf patches.

    XieRong’s wild lawn & neighbour’s manicured lawn, Surrey England 

    TianFu Square in1980, ChengDu China

    XieRong’s father in TianFu Square, 1991, ChengDu China

    TianFu Square Lawn in1997, ChengDu China

    + Read more…

    STORM CHASER: A STUDIO VISIT WITH XIE RONG

    July 10, 2021 | Posted By: | Uncategorized |

    Fearless performance artist Xie Rong (also known as Echo Morgan) puts herself in vulnerable, uncomfortable positions to communicate strong political messages. Using her own body as a canvas, she invites her audience to bury her with stones, throw water on her and touch her pregnant stomach. Xie’s arresting performances infuse personal experiences growing up in China with broader political points about race, gender and cultural attitudes. She draws strength from the audience’s uneasiness and plays on relationships of control. With these unforgettable performances, coupled with strong photography by Jamie Baker, Xie is poised to make her mark in a big way. Today she tells us why she has dramatically pivoted her practice towards a deep concern for the environment.

    Text by Kate Neave

    Xie Rong, Light, photo Jamie Baker, Asian Culture Center, Gwangju, 2019

    ON HER LIGHT BULB MOMENT

    In 2019, I flew to Sydney and back for a single performance. I spent 48 hours in the air and only 30 hours on the ground. The trip prompted me to look into my carbon footprint and I discovered that flying from London to Sydney produces the equivalent amount of carbon dioxide that a resident of India produces over the course of an entire year. My performance in Australia had been connected to the sea, examining it as a border and addressing political policies towards refugees. But I felt so guilty about flying so far to perform a work about nature that I rewrote the entire script in my hotel room the night before. I performed a work about environmentalism that day and the experience made me step back and rethink my entire practice.

    Xie Rong, Sea 海, photo by Anna Kucera, Sydney Art Space, 2019

    ON SUNRISE

    When I admitted my regret, the curator told me to she wanted to meet me at 5am the next morning. She took me to her favourite spot on the beach to watch the sunrise. She told me that sometimes you have to remember moments, that experiences are important too. She told me how important it was for me to share my message and how much it meant for me to be there spreading it. She reminded me that as an artist you have to produce things. After doing all this research I wanted to find something I could do to counteract the environmental damage of travelling so I have adopted a plant-based diet. I feel like I’m contributing to the movement of changing. People have to realise that it’s down to individual action rather than system change. There are small efforts we can make in our daily life that will make a change.

    Xie Rong, Delete, photo by Jamie Baker, Toynbee Studio, London, 2017

    ON THE POWER OF NATURE

    The whole experience led me to deeply research environmentalism. I’ve spent the pandemic looking into the crossovers between performance art, action art and activism in this context. I’ve found so much strength and power in what other artists have done. I was talking to the artist Betsy Damon and she said, “I will only do art that belongs to the ecosystem and I will only teach art that is activism”. I felt that was such a grand and meaningful decision. I’ve made a film about my research this past year that juxtaposes found footage and still images. I’ve been thinking about how much my own work could actually make a change. I usually perform in galleries, but I’ve started asking myself am I brave enough to actually go out on the street to stage a performance and risk being arrested?

    Xie Rong, Be the inside of the vase, photo Jamie Baker, Dyson Gallery, London, 2012

    ON THE POLITICS OF A PATCH OF GRASS

    One area that has really interested me is the subject of lawns. It felt like a subject that had a lot of historical and cultural roots that I could dig into. Many years ago, in China, my father invested money to buy a prominent site in our city centre and later discovered the square that it was situated on was to be a huge lawn. Lawn does not grow well in China. It sat on the edge of a dead patch of land for 15 years. The lawn space was installed as a symbol of a modern international city. English culture has influenced the world for decades, and lawns are really symbolic of that. American lawns are symbolic of man conquering nature and by extension indigenous people. A lawn represents a certain history; it’s more than just a piece of grass. It has historical roots. We need to revisit our history books and reflect on what we have normalised. I love what Zheng Bo said, that art needs to be a multispecies celebration and I feel this inclusiveness needs to be discussed.

    Xie Rong, Home, photo Jamie Baker, Galerie Huit, Hong Kong, 2017

    ON MOVING FORWARD SIDE-BY-SIDE

    The message I always got when I lived in China was that capitalism is killing the planet. I always reacted against it because I felt I was being brainwashed against capitalism. But now, having lived in this country for 20 years, I’m starting to think maybe I believe it. For me, as a Chinese artist, I feel this responsibility to address the global scale. I want to have more dialogue and encourage more exchange of information. With the pandemic, China is in danger of withdrawing to protect itself in this bubble. I feel the need to be more present in the Chinese art scene because I feel this dialogue is so important. If we want the planet to change we have to work together.

    Xie Rong, Circle of Fire, photo Jamie Baker, Röda Sten Konsthall, Gothenburg, 2018

    Xie Rong’s ecological research film ‘Eco Echo’ can be viewed here. The film was supported by Chinese Arts Now festival through Arts Council England funding, and will be shown at the Transmission Gallery in Glasgow during COP26

    This feature is part of ‘Unearthed: Eco-visionaries’ a thought-provoking series by Kate Neave uncovering contemporary artists at the forefront of environmental thought. We discover artists that engage with the natural world, explore topics at the frontier of art and nature or shed light on an environmental issue. Taking inspiration from these creative practitioners, we join the complex conversation about the climate crisis, harnessing creativity’s power to reach a deeper understanding and be a catalyst for change.

    + Read more…

    Eco Echo

    April 15, 2021 | Posted By: | Academic Research · Art Protest · blog: film link |

    STAY CONNECTED: CHINESE ARTS NOW 2021 FESTIVAL

    15 April 2021

    Echo Morgan (Xie Rong) is a performance artist. She has always been interested in the relationship between Body, Memory and Politics through gesture, mark making and storytelling. Through video and an audience Q&A, she will share her research into some inspirational artist’s projects (including Betsy Damon, Zheng Bo and Song Chen), that address important environmental issues through the theme of water, plants and soil.

    + Read more…

    English Patient / 英国病人

    September 25, 2020 | Posted By: | Art Protest · covid19 · Live Performance |

    Narrative writing for Above the Cloud Performance Festival, Yu Nan, China

    4月24号
     
    前些日子有个段子很流行,新冠疫情阻击战,中国打上半场,全世界打下半场,海外华人打全场。的确如此,这三个月里我的身份:女儿,妻子,母亲,移民,老师,艺术家,中国人让我的心绪时而忧虑,时而悲伤,时而困惑,时而愤怒。当然也有感动,也有鼓舞。四月快要结束了,在此梳理理一下零散的记疫。 
    + Read more…

    Body Politics

    October 2, 2019 | Posted By: | Art Protest · body-politics · Exhibitions · Live Performance · News |

    02/10/2019

    Human 人 -Little white flower
    Live performance @ilminmuseumofart📸 @jamiebakerphotography
    1997, I was 14years old. I had my first article published on national newspaper. I passionately wrote my grief for the death of DengXiaoPing. Sorrow is a strange thing when you see everyone around you was crying, tv channel was playing funeral songs, over over again, all newspapers were filed with condolences … people were in black and wore white paper flowers, it affect you, It makes you sad, our school decided to stop classes for three days instead we were setting in the classroom watching documentaries about Deng’s achievement and folding hundreds of thousands white paper flowers. We then decorated them around the classrooms, hallway, and every trees around the school.

    Yesterday was PR China’s 70 years birthday. The entire nation was celebrating its victory and power. My cousin woke up 6am in the morning to watch the rising flag ceremony at the city square in my hometown ChengDu. All her classmates were in uniforms, standing in the rain, national flag painted on their little face, shined with bright smiles. On TV, I watched the replay of the whole parade. The familiar pride, smiles, absolute perfection, millions of people in one voice, millions of steps in uniformed movement. The patriotism was in the air and deep in people’s blood. .

    Five demands, no one less. The message from Hongkong is loud and serious, one 18years old protester was shot on the chest right next his heart … watching them online, they have nothing but a brave heart. 269 people were arrested on the national day, 178 male, 91 female. age from 12-71. Aiweiwei posted the number this morning.
    My heart and thoughts goes to Hongkong. It’s not about Hongkong independence! They have shown the real hope for democracy and real strength of dignity! Once were so precious to the true Chinese identity and still so important to our world peace and humanity.


     

    29/09/2019

    Human 人- Prisoners 囚

    When I was 3years old, a disable old man bought me a rocking horse. He told me the first English word I knew: “ White “. He was my grandfather. One of the most intelligent man I have never get to know. Grandpa Yong, speaks five languages. That made him one the main target in the culture revolution. A Slave to Western Culture. The red guards broken his legs and he died of depression in early 90s.
    I whitened my face, while telling the story, I applied two brush strokes with finger: two line joined at the top splits down the bottom, like a standing man, read: 人 Ren, : Human. Black ink covered my mouth, silenced me.
    Live performance at Ilmin Museum of Art
    Seoul, Korea

    Part of PAN Asia performance festival

    Photo by Jamie Baker

    Waves of arrests in Hongkong. “Police have rounded up children as young as 12 years old on suspicion of unlawful assembly, possession of offensive weapons or rioting, often based solely on the color of their clothing and objects in their bags. Of the 1,596 people arrested since protests began in June, 464 were students, including 207 this month. “ – Los Angeles Times.

    Families began to warn me, what to say and what not to post ; Friends are divided over opinions…

     

    05/08/2019

    Light

    Those flowers

    The laughter reminds me of those flowers,
    Quietly open for me in every corner of my life,
    I thought I would always be by her side,
    Today we have left, searching in different parts of the world.
    How are they?
    Are they still there?
    They have been blown away by the wind and scattered around the horizon.

    Some stories haven’t finished yet, forget it!
    Those moods are hard to distinguish between true and false in the years.
    Now there are no flowers in the grass.
    Fortunately, I witnessed your beauty in spring, autumn, winter and summer.
    How are those flower?
    Where are they now?
    Old umbrella, hospital stand, 12 ropes and fairy-lights.
    12 words:
    #Light, #love, #hope, #trust, #air, #water, #earth, #imaging, #feel, #freedom, #forgive, #dream

    4 balconies, 8 doors. I build a #lighthouse inside the #museum.

    Live performance @mdbkleipzig
    @alfred_weidinger
    Video by
    @lumalenscape
    Sound art by
    #andreastrobollowitsch

    Yoko Ono “Peace is Power” exhibition @yokoonoofficial
    Heavy heart following the live-stream of Hongkong Protest. Don’t know where the passion will leads the land … reading brutal comments from opposite viewers. Only finding peace in Patti Smith’s words :
    This is
    a mourning wreath
    nothing but grief
    nothing but blooms
    cascading as dust
    nothing but hatred
    and the terrible cost

    #grief#flower#dust#umbrella#hongkong#future#xierong#extraditionbill#onecountrytwosystems#香港#返送中

    24th/07/2019

    At the other side of the water
    Chinese song from 1975

    Verdant green grass, Misty white fog
    There is someone at the other side of the water, I wish to drift down steam, to meet up with my closed one. However, there is dangerous swamp awaits and the journey far and long. I wish to force the wave and push up searching for her direction. far away vaguely I see her standing right there: in the center of the water.
    An old man was interviewed to tell his story about the Great Escape. Vast numbers of mainlanders fled to #Hongkong illegally by swam cross the “XiangJiang” river which divided the broader from mainland and Hongkong. During the 1950-1970 it also define the opposition between capitalism and socialism. He was 14years old, swam, ran and hide for months, together with his mother they swam crossed the XiangJiang river. The rain was heavy… a big flood is on its way, the mother and son grabbed hold of a tree, mother pushed him to climbed up, suddenly many voices shouted from the tree. “push him down, it’s full here!” In the dark light they realized there were hundreds of people also in the water, many try to grab his legs and pull him down. The mother begged:”please let him stay, I lost my husband and other son in the water already! He is only 14! He needs to stay alive, pull him up please!” People did, helped her to hold him up, she used her body to support him … for hours, she stood in the water… the rain gets heavier, waves crashed in, dragged her into the dark. After that storm, many baby floated up but he never found hers.
    The Chinese word “Sea” constructed in three parts: water, human and mother.

    It’s a word about bodies. body of human, body of water. body of individual and collective history.

    We all remember little #AlanKurdi that three-year-old Syrian boy drowned in the Mediterranean Sea. We all saw photo of two bodies in one red t-shirt. Face down, died but together. The Salvadoran migrant #OscarMartinezRamirez and his 23months old daughter, who #drownedwhile trying to cross the Rio Grande in Matamoros.

    Human history is a record of #migration; migration is search for #home.

    Photo by @annakucera.au Curated by @alexieglass
    #xierong

    16/06/2019

    家- HongKong on my mind

    家 (Jia) means Home, Family and Country. But most dearly It’s my mother’s middle name. My mother’s early life meets every changing political event in modern China.

    My mother was born in 1957, two years after the birth of her brother, my mum is the seventh daughter in the family. Her arrival had broken my great-granny’s dream for more grandsons so my mum was the “bad luck”. Her childhood was during The Three Years of Natural Disasters. She remembered she was always starving.

    During those year 1957, 1962, 1972 and 1979 marked the four major booms in illegal emigration to Hong Kong, as mainlanders had suffered greatly from the Cultural Revolution, which included vast famine. According to research and my investigations, about two million people flooded into Hong Kong as illegal immigrants, often with great personal loss, and more people died on their way or were caught and repatriated.

    There are many touching footages shown when some of the mainland Chinese illegal immigrants hide in the mountains, the local Hongkong citizen brought food and clothes to help, they even surrounded the deportation vans and threw food into the vans… eventually that group of illegal immigrants stayed in HongKong! The wave of illegal emigration also prompted the mainland authorities to rethink their economic policy, scholars said. Late paramount leader Deng Xiaoping, who was said to blame extreme leftist policies for the mass escape, launched the “reform and opening up” policy and endorsed the development of Shenzhen – a key hub for illegal migration – into a special economic zone in the late 1970s … .

    2017, together with my mother and my boys I had my first Solo exhibition in HongKong, the local Art Hongkong Magazine kindly made this cover of me. Same year HongKong Perspective awarded me the “40 under 40 Art price .” .

    My heart is with all the Hongkonger on the street protest today! For your strength and bravery! Please stay safe.The world is watching and celebrating the solidarity with you! ❤️ .
    Photo by Photo by Jamie Baker

    #extraditionbill#onecountrytwosystems#hongkong#protest#law#nochinaextradition#voiceofpeople#反送中#一國兩制#香港#東方之珠#逃犯條例#撑香港#616

    14/06/2019

    Pearl of the Orient 🇭🇰 By Luo Da You
    Little river convolutedly flows to the south

    Drifting to Hong Kong to take a look

    Pearl of the Orient, my love

    Your elegant demeanor and romanticism are still the same?

    The harbor of curve moon

    The color of night is deep, and the light and the fire are sparkling and bright

    Pearl of Orient doesn’t sleep all night
    Keep the promise of vicissitudes of life

    Have let the sea wind blow for five thousand years

    As if each tear speaks about your dignity… 💧

    1997, I heard this song for the first time and sang it passionately in the People’s square with millions of ChengDu citizens to celebrate the return of Hongkong to our motherland. I was 14, like the rest of the mainland China girls I thought I was free and Hongkong is coming home!
    It has been hard few days following up the news and watching the story turned darker… reading the papers in both Chinese and English with completely different narratives that painted opposite sense of realities … ( most of mainland Chinese won’t even know what happened in Hongkong because all the news are consorted and removed, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are blocked ). The more I look into the situation the more I questioning my life grew up in 80’s China and recall my recent memories when I visited my Chinese artist friends who are live in fears and under oppressions. All the unfair legal cases that happened to the people I knew and cared … It is easy for one to conclude that China has no #humanrights but it is heartbreaking to gradually realized that yourself! Because it is still where all my family are live and where my roots are deeply buried and a home where I wish my children will keep loving! 💔

    #teargas#rubberbullets#violence#extraditionbill#onecountrytwosystems#hongkong#china#fugitives#trust#law#nochinaextradition#notinmyname#voiceofpeople#performanceart#actionart#emotion#xierong#nohatred#fakenews#反送中#一國兩制#香港#東方之珠#逃犯條例#撑香港

    Performance photo by Photo by Jamie Baker

    I was attacked by 150 water balloons. After live performance Break the Vase.

    + Read more…

    Baltic Sea

    September 23, 2019 | Posted By: | Exhibitions · Live Performance · News |


    Jamie Baker

    Xie Rong: Sea
    Durational performance
    Saturday 19.10. between 13-16
    Wäinö Aaltonen Museum of Art, Itäinen Rantakatu 38
    As part of Wäinö Aaltonen Museum’s When Is Now -exhibition

     

    Friday 18.10.2019

    WHEN WHAT INFO WHERE
    18:00  Panu Pihkala: Earth Emotions  Performance lecture  Viinatehdas MANILLA
    19:15  Leena Kela: Space Here We Come  Performance lecture  MANILLA courtyard
    20:00 Nathalie Mba Bikoro: Black A(n)thena  Performance TEHDAS Theatre MANILLA
    21:00  Leyya Mona Tawil: Lime Rickey International’s Future Faith  Performance  Viinatehdas MANILLA
    22:00  FESTIVAL Lounge  Bars open!  TEHDAS bar + courtyard MANILLA

    Saturday 19.10.2019

    WHEN WHAT INFO WHERE
    9:00-17:00  Salla Talvikki Nieminen: Free Verse Work  Durational performance  City centre – place TBA
    11:00  STRETCH 2019 keynote: What is the point of it all? Working internationally in the age of ecological crisis Visitor and Innovation Center Joki Kupittaa
    13-16 Xie Rong: Sea Durational performance Wäinö Aaltonen Museum of Arts
    13:30-16:30 Henna Laininen: My Climate Emotions (workshop) Workshop on climate emotions Enrollments here
    14:30 Antti Tolvi & Tero Niskanen: Honk  Durational moving performance Multiple performance spots – starting point at Mannerheiminpuisto
    17:00  Leyya Mona Tawil: TURKU FUTURE FOLK DANCE LAUNCH  Performance  City Centre
    18-02 Stirnimann – Stojanovic: – The Space –  Durational performance Vanha Viinatehdas / Danasali MANILLA
    Hourly/start 18:30 Tiia Kasurinen: Life of Harmony – Extended  Series of performance choreographies  Studio MANILLA
    Hourly/start 18:30  Tytti Arola: The Silakka Triptych  Series ofperformative concerts  TEHDAS Theater MANILLA
    20:00  Niko Hallikainen: Television  Performance Viinatehdas MANILLA
    21:30  Ali Al-Fatlawi & Wathiq Al-Ameri  Performance Aurinkobaletti MANILLA
    22-03  FESTIVAL CLUB: Clubbing dancing and partying until early hours Evening programme  TEHDAS Theatre + Viinatehdas + courtyard of MANILLA

    Sunday 20.10.2019

    WHEN WHAT INFO WHERE
    13:30  Fern Orchestra: Vox HerbāriumNOTE! Transportation leaves at Manilla at 13:30. The performance starts at 14:00 at Ruissalo. Enrollment for the transportation and performance here (limited seats)  Performance  Ruissalo Botanical Garden
    16:30 Qi Gong & meditation by AnttiTolvi  Taiji and meditation class Vanha Viinatehdas MANILLA
    17:30- EVENING SNACK AND FINAL DISCUSSION. Festival ends with joint early evening snacks and discussion about the festival themes and performances. The discussion is moderated by Marika Räty (Arts Promotion Centre Finland)
    + Read more…

    Body of Work

    September 11, 2019 | Posted By: | News · Press · reviews |

    Body of Work

    Interview by Jing Zhang

    Published on Aug of 2019 Prestige Magazine

    + Read more…

    Echoes from Jeju Island

    August 11, 2019 | Posted By: | Exhibitions · Live Performance · News |


    + Read more…

    52 ARTISTS 52 ACTIONS book launch

    July 12, 2019 | Posted By: | Exhibitions · Press · reviews |

     

    In a year of Instagramming dangerously, 52 artists respond to critical issues across the broader Asia region.

    Description

    The mainstream media keeps us in a constant state of emergency where the word ‘crisis’ is used daily and ‘breaking news’ is a permanent banner across our screens. The real emergencies we should be facing are often disguised behind biased rhetoric or consciously omitted altogether: Climate change! Severe economic inequality! Decay of democracy! Brexit! Trump! The alt-right!

    52 ARTISTS 52 ACTIONS sets out to address the real and daunting trials of everyday life across contemporary Asia. Each of the 52 artists includes a statement about their work, which often reads as a compelling, heartbreaking memoir in miniature, giving deep insights into cultural traditions.

    Echo Morgan – cover artist – says this:

    I was sent away at the age of four after my parents’ divorce to board at a much-hated, strict communist kindergarten. There I was shaped into a ‘xiao hong hua’, a little red flower, obedient and pliant. This early communist education and China’s economic boom is deeply embodied in my roots. They still strongly control my thoughts and behaviour.

    Other highlights include:

    – Kyungah Ham’s Korean Mona Lisas
    – Deborah Kelly’s crowd-sourced feminist wisdom as print-at-home stickers and posters
    – Heman Chong’s list of 198 forms of non-violent action
    – Chim Pom’s oversized jigsaw puzzle, Find the C*&R!!!, in response to Japan becoming increasingly strict about nudity even though Asia’s largest red-light district, Kabukicho, is in Shinjuku, Tokyo
    – The Mulka Project’s mission to sustain and protect Yolngu cultural knowledge in north-east Arnhem Land under the leadership of community elders.

    52 ARTISTS 52 ACTIONS champions small acts of disobedience undertaken live and online by 52 artists from 31 countries across Asia, addressing important concerns locally and globally.

    From historical revisionism in the Philippines to micro-celebrities in Bangladesh, military abuse in Myanmar to rising sea levels in Indonesia, visibility for LGBTQI+ people of colour to contemporary Indigeneity, the artists tackle critical issues with determination, innovation and humour. Each week, the work of a different artist is presented in a unique context, spanning a year of new artistic practice across the region.

    Exploring the role of activism and protest throughout, the focus is on art-as-action that has the power to raise awareness and invoke change. With striking images and bold, graphic design, 52 ARTISTS 52 ACTIONS is an encyclopaedia of creative responses to political and social issues facing contemporary Asia.

    + Read more…

    PAINTING UNTIL IT BECOMES MARBLE

    June 12, 2019 | Posted By: | blog: film link · Exhibitions · Live Performance · News · Press · reviews |

    XIE RONG PERFORMS YOKO ONO’S PAINTING UNTIL IT BECOMES MARBLE

    Leipzig, Germany – May 2019

    Museum der bildenden Künste Leipzig

    By Madeline Bocaro ©

    Watch the performance video:

    Following her intense performance of Yoko Ono’s Cut Piece (as Echo Morgan) at the Peace Is Power exhibition in Leipzig (April 2019), the amazing artist Xie Rong performed another of Ono’s works at the museum’s retrospective of Yoko’s career. Although Yoko’s Painting Until It Becomes Marble is an actual painting rather than a conceptual one, Rong performed a live interpretation of Yoko’s work. Immersing herself in paint and becoming a part of the actual work is an integral aspect of Xie Rong’s art. She applied her own method to Yoko’s static painting, and the result was stunning.

    Yoko’s original work is a black and white ink drawing which is an accordion style fold-out. It was first shown during her first solo art exhibition Paintings and Drawings by Yoko Ono, at Fluxus founder George Maciunas’ AG Gallery in New York City.  Painting Until It Becomes Marble came with Yoko’s instruction that visitors were to “cut their favorite parts until the whole thing is gone”. It was also shown at MoMA in 2015 as part of Yoko Ono: One Woman Show, 1960-1971.

    Xie Rong’s live interpretation of Yoko’s painting was stunning. Yoko’s original painting actually has some ‘movement’ in its accordion folded shape. Rong took it to a new level, breathing new life into the piece. Reverently and ceremoniously, the artist stood quietly in the huge empty space with extremely high floor-to-ceiling windows emitting a background of pure light. Dressed all in white, Xie Rong stood with two bowls at her feet, one filled with Chinese black ink and the other with pure blue pigment powder. The artist combed the ink through her long black hair, saturating it and began to paint on a very large canvas on the floor.

    Rong’s barefooted dance began – at first light and graceful like a ballerina, then more intensely, furiously jumping as her drenched hair splattered paint in all directions and on herself. ‘Jack the Dripper’ (Jackson Pollack) has fierce competition! The chaotic calligraphy continued with her head to the floor, making brush strokes. Kneeling with her head down on the canvas, submitting to the work in reverence, she made thicker strokes and swirls. Covered in ink, her white clothing and skin took on the characteristics of the actual artwork.

    Xie Rong:

    “An amazing aspect of the performance was the sound! This heavenly space is where they displayed Yoko’s cricket cages. I sang this song and told the story about losing my mother in law two weeks ago. And I invited audiences to rise the painting with me! But the paper dropped and become a cloud!”

    Read the full article on:

    Xie Rong Performs Yoko Ono’s Painting Until it Becomes Marble

    + Read more…

    Stone and Light

    June 12, 2019 | Posted By: | blog: film link · Exhibitions · Live Performance · News · Press |

     

    XIE RONG – STONE AND LIGHT

     

     By Madeline Bocaro ©

    Xie Rong performs her new works:

    Story of the Stone/ To Reach the Light

    (inspired by Yoko Ono) 

    at Yoko Ono: Peace Is Power exhibition @mdbkleipzig in Leipzig Germany

    May 11, 2019.

    Watch the performance videos:

     

    Story of the Stone

    This work by Xie Rong is inspired by three of Yoko Ono’s works; Three Mounds, Riverbed and Rising (lyrics).

    Xie Rong: “I wish to create a piece to bring illumination and sound into the darkness. To connect all the rooms into the main hall, create movement of audiences. From 9:30 Andreas played music create tension and atmosphere. 10pm, Me, in a mirror suit, walking into the main hall. I stood inside a rope light, silent, I will sing “Olive Tree” then I walk off to collect all the ropes, I shout out to each floor and balcony, drag ropes between people. Creating spider web collection between the three museum floors and four exhibition rooms.” … …


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    My Cut Piece

    May 20, 2019 | Posted By: | Exhibitions · Live Performance · News |

    MdbK Leipzig, Yoko Ono “PEACE is POWER”, Eröffnung, Performance “Cut Piece”, Echo Morgan

    Cut piece ✂️

    Last night, I performed my “One Woman Show”. It is a title that borrowed from Yoko Ono’s MoMA’s exhibition in 2015. It was my 5th performance piece that responded to Yoko’s work.
    This morning, tiredly woke up from sore muscles. I watched the video of Theresa May’s resign speech. Her usually steely demeanour collapsed, her voice cracking with emotion, she said:” The second female prime minister but certainly not the last. I do so with no ill-will, but with enormous and enduring gratitude to have had the opportunity to serve the country I love.” Suddenly, it reminded me of the aloneness and vulnerability I experienced before, during and after the “Cut Piece”. It’s a historical piece, I had exception and preparation for it. But it was still very challenging for me and the audiences.

    1.The stage was high, because there were hundreds of audiences.

    2.I was programmed into an opening timeline which the mayor and museum director were waiting to give a speech.

    3.A daughter came with her mother,shaking, her mother encouraged :” Do it! Do it!” she cut small piece of my shirt “yes!” Her mother shouted loudly with proud!

    4.A man walked up brutally took my bra and swung in the air! Whole room cheered!

    5. As soon as my bra was off, two women jumped in front the queue. Quickly, collaboratively, tightly, they swaddled me together like a new born baby.

    6. A woman gently removed my underpants, Later watching the footage I realised she was sobbing.

    7. An elder woman ran close to the stage after my underpants was removed. She stood apart her legs, lifted up her long skirt, cut a small piece of fabric, she faced the audiences, like a warrior. She turned around and covered my crotch. She then held her both hands bowed me like a Buddha.

    8. The second day, she waited for me in the museum and wanted to check if I was ok, she never heard about the original Cut piece so she was deeply sadden and dramatised by the action and process.

    9. Dinner, one of curator call me the best actress, others angry:” You shouldn’t be allowed to cut your own hair to end the show! Because it’s Yoko’s work !

    10. The sound was a sculpture and movement was a drawing!


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    Cut Piece_interview

    May 12, 2019 | Posted By: | blog: film link · Exhibitions · Live Performance · Press · reviews |

    April 9, 2019

    XIE RONG (ECHO MORGAN) PERFORMS YOKO ONO’S CUT PIECE

    @ Yoko Ono: Peace Is Power exhibition 2019

    Museum der bildenden Künste Leipzig

    By Madeline Bocaro ©  

    I had a wonderful chat with artist Echo Morgan about her performance. Yoko requested that Cut Piece be performed at the opening of her Peace Is Power exhibition in Leipzig. Over time this masterpiece – performed many times by Yoko and by other artists – has become legendary. Echo Morgan was approached by the museum to be the performer, as they were interested in bringing her own art to the museum at a later date.

    Photo: Alexander Schmidt

    MdbK Leipzig, Yoko Ono “PEACE is POWER”, Eröffnung, Performance “Cut Piece”, Echo Morgan

    Echo’s statement:

    “I made a promise to myself not to participate in other artist’s work; not to react someone else’s performance…When Alfred Weidinger, the director of the Museum of Fine arts Leipzig approached me with the idea of performing Yokos Cut Piece. I fall into deep thoughts.
    Cut Piece was first performed by Yoko Ono on July 20, 1964 at Yamaichi Hall, Kyoto, Japan. The artist entered the stage in her best dress, sat in a traditional sitting position, and invited the audience to cut pieces of her clothing with scissors and take the piece with them.

    I met Yoko in 2009 at a design boutique in Notting-hill gate, Feathers, where I have worked throughout my study years in London. I helped her chose few outfits: jackets and shirts and 5 hats. While packing the clothes, I said to her: My husband gave me a piece of broken vase in 2003, he said it was from your live performance in Tate Modern and you invited the audiences to put the vase back together in 2013, we got married in 2004 and we have been cherish that piece of vase and really look forward to rebuilding it with her. Yoko smiled and asked me for pen and paper. She wrote down: Dear Luke and Echo, I give you a sun. Love, Yoko Ono. She even drew a smiley sun.
    2011, I separated with Luke, went to the Royal College of Art and became a performance artist. Same year, I did a performance: I Buried My Loss, together with many sentimental letters and photos I left the note from Yoko and her piece of vase behind. The only thing I kept was his surname: Morgan.
    As a pioneer in conceptual and performance art, Yoko’s work has moved and influenced many people. Including myself! I do feel deeply honoured to be approached to perform her Cut Piece at the opening of YOKO ONO PEACE IS POWER at MdbKLepizig. So, for one time only I will break my own promise, this is my tribute and love for Yoko’s art and life I do believe it is a fate that I have to take this offer. There for, I would like to take this opportunity and mark this performance as my last performance under the name Echo Morgan.

    There was some controversy over having an established young artist in her own rite (who happened to be Asian) perform the piece, as some thought that her resemblance to Yoko would make her seem like an imitator. However, after the curators met with Echo (a Chinese artist based in London) they realized her deep understanding and determination to do this work, and agreed that she was perfect for the piece.

    Cut Piece (Yoko Ono, Grapefruit 1964)

    Performer sits on stage with a pair of scissors placed in front of her and asks the audience to come up on the stage, one by one, and cut a portion of her clothing (anywhere they like) and take it. The performer, however, does not have to be a woman.

    Echo told me that her experience was surreal. She was haunted by the large size of the room (1,000 seats which were all filled, as was the standing room) and a live stream to 9,000 visitors in the gallery.

    The circumstances (beyond Echo’s control) were more like a grand theatrical staging. Echo did not realize that the museum had the event programmed as a 90-minute performance, as the director and the mayor were to give speeches at the end. She was now on a schedule that she could not control and was worried when some aggressive participants cut large chunks of her clothing early on, speeding the piece along too quickly.

    Echo ceremoniously approached the stage, sitting side-legged in the same way that Yoko had done, remaining motionless. She made the announcement, “Take the scissors. Cut a small piece of my clothes, One at a time. Take it with you. It is a gift.” She added, “My body is the scar of my mind.” paraphrasing Yoko’s song “O’Wind” from the album Fly (1971).

    Although this stipulation was not in the original instruction, Yoko had always worn her best clothing for each performance – usually sacrificing a black dress from the London shop Biba. Echo wore formal designer attire; a white Dolce & Gabbana shirt, a black Prada skirt, a black Armani jacket and Chanel shoes.

    Echo told me that she added the detail of black tights and high heels as a feminist statement (Charlotte Moorman had worn a ball gown during her several performances of Cut Piece). The artist’s shoes were removed by two participants, each of whom took one shoe and promised to bring them back again in 100 years (a reference to Yoko’s Promise Piece, which had originally inspired Echo’s performance).

    Echo was completely absorbed in the moment, enjoying the sound of the cutting and of people’s footsteps echoing from the floorboards in the large hall. She was startled when man cut her bra and waved it around triumphantly, provoking opposing reactions – cheers and gasps of anger – from the large crowd viewing the live stream. But she knew that she was relatively safe amongst so many viewers. Other cutters were more hesitant, and most were less aggressive than she expected.

    The cutters were also greatly affected. Most women were stunned by the performance and participated in a motherly, protective manner. When Echo’s bra was removed, two women wrapped the artist’s naked torso in two scarves – swaddling her like a baby. The director signaled that this would be a beautiful note on which to end the performance, but Echo decided to remove the scarf and continue.  When all of the artist’s clothing was finally cut away, a woman made a grand gesture by cutting off a large piece of her own skirt, placing it across Echo’s lap, clasping her hands and bowing down to the artist as though she were a deity (the essence of Yoko’s intent of Cut Piece – the selflessness of Buddha*).

    *Read my story about Yoko’s Cut Piece:

    https://madelinex.com/2017/01/20/yoko-ono-cut-piece/

    A most touching detail devised by Echo was at the end of the performance. When completely naked, she picked up the scissors and cut a piece of her own hair and left it on the stage before standing up and walking away. “It is a gesture of returning her a promise that I lost.”The intent was “To leave a part of me, after nothing was left of me, – my DNA – for her in return for that piece of vase that I had lost.” (Promise Piece). The artist asked Yoko’s long-time curator Jon Hendricks for permission to do this, which he gave wholeheartedly, knowing that Yoko would appreciate this addition. But of course, this ‘edit’ provoked a big reaction amongst the German art crowd. However, it was a poignant gesture that Yoko would certainly love – with its subtle reference to Hair Peace (1969).

    Concerned museum patrons approached Echo the following day, asking if she was OK. This was her final performance as Echo Morgan. She will use her name Xie Rong from this point forward.

     

    Watch Cut Piece online:

     

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    Yoko Ono and I

    April 14, 2019 | Posted By: | Exhibitions · News |

    Yoko Ono and I in 2009, Notting Hill Gate, Feathers Boutique

    Cut Piece ✂️

    I made a promise to myself not to participate in other artist’s work; not to react someone els’s performance after a heartfelt and inspiring conversation with John Court in Beijing. When Alfred Weidinger, the director of the Museum of Fine arts Leipzig approached me with the idea of performing Yoko’s Cut Piece. I fall into deep thoughts.
    Cut Piece was first performed by YokoOno on July 20, 1964 at Yamaichi Hall, Kyoto, Japan. The artist entered the stage in her best dress, sat in a traditional sitting position, and invited the audience to cut pieces of her clothing with scissors and take the piece with them.

    I met Yoko in 2009, at a design boutique in Notting-hill gate. Feathers, where I have worked throughout my study years in London. I helped her chose few outfits: jackets and shirts and 5 hats. While packing the clothes, I said to her: My husband gave me a piece of broken vase in 2003, he said it was from your live performance in Tate Modern and you invited the audiences to put the vase back together in 2013, we got married in 2004 and we have been cherish that piece of vase and really look forward to rebuilding it with her. Yoko smiled and asked me for pen and paper. She wrote down: Dear Luke and Echo, I give you a sun. Love, Yoko Ono. She even drew a smiley sun.
    2011, I separated with Luke, went to the Royal College of Art and became a performance artist. Same year, I did a performance: I Buried My Loss, together with many sentimental letters and photos I left the note from Yoko and her piece of vase behind. The only thing I kept was his surname: Morgan.

    As a pioneer in conceptual and performance art, Yoko’s work has moved and influenced many people. Including myself! I do feel deeply honoured to be approached to perform her Cut Piece at the opening of YOKO ONO. PEACE is POWER at @mdbkleipzig So for one time only I will break my own promise, this is my tribute and love for Yoko’s art and life. I do believe it is a fate that I have to take this offer. There for, I would like to take this opportunity and mark this performance as my last performance under the name Echo Morgan.

    With Yoko’s best friend, the Curator of Yoko Ono exhibition: Jon Hendricks after performed Cut Piece, 3rd of April 2019

    Unfortunately, Yoko didn’t come to the Opening and the only day she could visited the exhibition Peace is Power in Leipzig was on my mother in law’s funeral …

    I am proud for doing this piece! It’s my way to return that piece of vase (PromisePiece) to her.

    Watch the whole performance online:

     

     

     

     

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    Fire of Yi People

    November 12, 2018 | Posted By: | blog: film link · Exhibitions · Live Performance · News · Press |




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    Body Calligraphy: The Performance Work of Echo Morgan _ By Luise Guest

    August 10, 2018 | Posted By: | News · Press · reviews |

     



    Body Calligraphy: The Performance Work of Echo Morgan

    Echo Morgan is the English name of Xie Rong, a Chengdu-born, London-based, multi-disciplinary artist whose work is underpinned by a dark family story. She works with stereotypes of ‘Chineseness’ and femininity in order to subvert them. Morgan has written texts on her skin using red lipstick, black Chinese ink, white ‘ink’ made from jasmine tea, and her own breast milk after giving birth to her second child. She has played with tropes of Chinoiserie, painting her naked body to resemble blue and white porcelain, and then inviting the audience to violently wash the patterns away by hurling water-filled balloons at her. Her work mines her own experiences of childhood, family, marriage and motherhood – and those of her female ancestors. She is a story-teller.

    … …

    Juxtaposing English narration with Chinese traditional songs, Morgan plays with her complex hybrid identity and her difficult childhood. She explores the territory of translation: between two languages, between gesture and stillness, between her Chinese past and English present, between performance and image.

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    The Body is Cultural – Xie Rong’s Home at Galerie Huit Hong Kong

    April 14, 2017 | Posted By: | News · Press · reviews |

     

     

    The Body is Cultural – Xie Rong’s Home at Galerie Huit Hong Kong

    Galerie Huitis currently exhibiting the debut solo show in Hong Kong of the Chinese multi-disciplinary artist Xie Rong, otherwise known as Echo Morgan. Rong was born in the southwest province of ChengDu, China in 1983 and has lived and worked in London since the age of nineteen. Within her work, Rong oscillates between the role of performer, filmmaker, director and artistic narrator, operating across the intersection of a variety of mediums including painting, performance, film, prints, publications, short stories and audio works. The current exhibition, entitled 家Home, consists of an extension of the core thematic and aesthetic preoccupations Rong has explored in her previous work, predominantly the use of her personal prismatic and textured family experience as a reflection of the political, ideological and philosophical complexities and transformations of Chinese society…

    A Broader Reflection of the Female Working Class Experience

    The second dominating project within the exhibition is Rong’s sequel to I am a Brush, from which the exhibition takes it’s name – Home. The piece is comprised of an original performance, a video work and the parchment retaining the traces of Rong’s performative presence. Homeis reminiscent of Rong’s previous performance pieces including Be the Inside of the Vase (2012) and Little Red Flower (2012). The correlation can be seen within two avenues. Firstly the use of the narration of her own troubled childhood and relationship with her parents (particularly her father) and by extension the society within which she was raised. Secondly, the process of transforming her body into symbols, be it the Chinese national flag, blue and white porcelain, Chinese landscape painting or in the case of Home a more monochromatic reflection of the contradictions between her cultural identity. In this sense, in Home, Rong projects a more overt reflection of her cultural juxtapositions and her attempts to reconcile her socialized political and gender conforming upbringing with her intellectual and political confliction through her international exposure. However, arguably this is a somewhat superficial reading as, in my opinion, „Home“ projects a broader reflection of the female working class experience of both east and west. In this respect, despite in the obvious cultural nuances, which are not to be diminished of critical importance, in actual fact the core narrative characteristics and anecdotes are largely a global tale of subjugation and a struggle for the psychologically, physically and financially oppressed to overcome.

    Ultimately, Rong’s debut Hong Kong exhibition depicts a strong foundational voice and aesthetic. Although there are notable influences from prior body art practice and both Eastern and Western cultural and artistic iconography – a large degree of indebtedness to Yoko Ono, Yves Klein and Carolee Schneemann, for example – Rong’s appropriation and assimilation of both cultural narratives is what makes her work particularly interesting from a critical perspective but also as an illustration of the interconnected and mutating cultural psyche’s of an internationalist ‘millennial’ practitioner….

     

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    You have my blood in you

    April 12, 2017 | Posted By: | blog: film link · Exhibitions · Live Performance |

    Watch Xie Rong’s  “Home” Performance online:

     

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    Art China_Interview_by Meng Yuan

    November 12, 2016 | Posted By: | Exhibitions · Live Performance · News · Press · reviews |

    logo.png

    Xie Rong x Echo Morgan – After her divorce in the UK, a petite Sichuan girl started her five-years performance art journey.

    Art China · Meng Yuan | 2016-11-03 17:20

    The first “Beijing·Live” International Performance Art Festival was held from October 15th to 23rd, 2016. More than 30 performance artists from 13 countries presented performance art works at the Danish Cultural Center. Echo Morgan performed her new work, My Father and My Son. The Art China reporter interviewed the artist Xie Rong and had a new understanding of her behavior.

    1. You were a designer at the beginning. What is the opportunity for you to switch to behavioral art creation?

    Yes, I was in college at the Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design. I belonged to the University of the Arts in London. When I was in school, I found that the boundaries between design and art were very vague. The graduation thesis at the time was influenced by Hélène Cixous’s theory of “negative writing”. In the book “Medusa’s Laughter,” she wrote: “Women must write about herself: must write a woman and bring a woman to writing… a woman must put herself in the text – bring her story back In the world and in history – through her own actions.”

    My graduation thesis is “The Symbol of Negative Writing and Identity”, and I wrote an autobiography “Xie Rong and the Thirsty Devil”. In the autobiography, I combed my family history into the “three steps”: the root of the school, the school of death and the school of dreams. This is a turning point in my spirit and a turning point in art.

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    Xie Rong’s paper self-made book

    I am a very emotional person. From small to large, I can feel the impact on my body and emotions around me. I like performance and like to speak, but I didn’t find a suitable channel to send it out. Body writing made me open my voice. I realized that my voice and my story are powerful. I used to think that this is just my personal experience. I think art is not personal but public. Everyone can feel and Experience, so I feel too personal to become very narrow. But after reading the book of Xisu, I found that it was not. When I put my body in the big age, I suddenly had power. I found the art of performance art and the sheep to express myself.

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    Xie Rong’s paper self-made book

    2. What is the first performance art work?

    In fact, this starts from the fact that I stopped writing for two years. When I was 21, I married an Irishman. After seven years, I separated. Later, I met my father to commit suicide. The two worlds collapsed at the same time, causing me to collapse. I have not created any works for two years. From 2011 I entered the Royal College of Art and followed Nigel Rolfe to study performance art.

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    “Send Book” was created in 2011 by artists during performances

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    “Book” was created in 2011. The artist is barefoot and uses ink to wash his hair.

    My first performance art work was “Send a Book,” which was created in 2011. I was studying printmaking and learned that the world’s first prints were made with women’s hair instead of silk. So I went back to the woman’s body and painted it with ink on her hair. The painting was very abstract and it was an understanding of my own hair. I spent five hours creating an eleven-meter abstract scroll that represents my eleven years with my ex-husband. After bathing, the water washed the paint off the hair, and the ink was painted all over the body. At that moment, I felt that I was born again. Many of my works draw on the works of predecessors and need to think about how to turn them into their own artistic language. I feel that my cultural background is very important.

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    Xie Rong is painting with his hair

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    “Send Book” was created in 2011. The artist paints on a long roll of eleven meters.

    3. This time, “My Father and My Son,” I used an object like a ball, which seems to appear in your previous work.

    The object was woven from bamboo strips and covered with more than 80 sheets of rice paper. The shape is not very precise. It is made up of two parts, like a lantern, uterus, breast, testicles, planet, silkworm cocoons, eggs, nests, and so on. It also appeared in my four-hour behavioral work, Be the Inside of the Vase, in 2012. The image at the time was more precise and it was a vase.

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    Bamboo and rice paper woven objects

    Objects appearing in “My Father and My Son”

    At that time, the museum did not allow me to ignite the vase. I stood in the whole body with Meilan Zhuju, and asked the audience to throw a water polo to break the vase. The story of my father and me has puzzled me for so many years, and I hope to break it. The audience broke the lantern with 150 water polo. The water polo lost its light in 5 minutes and washed off the blue and white porcelain patterns and pigments on my body.

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    Xie Rong painted part of the bamboo on his body

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    Xie Rong’s 2012 performance art work “Being the Inner of the Vase”, which also appeared similar objects

    One of the water polo players was very hard when they lost it. It hit my eyes and it hurts. The dark circles are like pandas for two weeks. This is a kind of violence. It is a retrospective of the cold violence I felt when I was a child. My mother has a face to face. I am not allowed to talk about their divorce. It is a mental imprisonment for me. At the time, an editor wrote a commentary and said that it was very repugnant to this kind of violence, and he did not know how to become a party to violence. She feels that the artist appears in a fragile and weak image, using his own vulnerability to make the audience become weaker, and the artist controls the mood of the audience.

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    The audience threw the water polo to the artist, the water polo broke the rice paper, and washed off the paint on the artist.

    4. You just mentioned that there is a water polo that hits your eyes. Does it mean that there are many sudden and random factors in the performance of performance art?

    Yes, there was an unexpected situation in the performance art performance of “My Father and My Son”. After my father died, I really wanted to burn the lanterns that were not allowed to be lit before. Originally, the fire was very beautiful when I was experimenting the previous day. The ashes floated up and slowly fell. At that time, it should be the end of my performance art. On the second day of the official performance, I found that the paste completely prevented me from burning the lantern. I used to use the pvc adhesive that was very flammable in the UK.

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    After the flames are gathered, leave scars and holes

    Everyone saw it at the time. Some people gave me a lighter. Many people who had heard my thoughts wondered how I would continue to the next step, and most of the audience didn’t know that this momentum was not my original idea. I found that I liked this kind of burning way. The flame burned up, and soon the flames went out again. It was both arrogant and subtle. Curator JonasStampe said that this is the sorrow of people. You want him to drift with the wind in a big fire, but it is always lingering. This is the most real emotion and life of man.

    Later, when I was communicating with a Swedish artist, he felt that the most striking thing about performance art was that while the audience was thinking, the artist was thinking about the direction of performance. This is also the place where performance art is different from step-by-step stage play. It is a real situation on the scene, rather than step by step according to the script. When I wanted to burn this lantern and burned it, during this time, everyone had a lot of ideas and removed all the factors of the stage and performance.

    5. You said that you have n’t thought about how to explain this work with your mother after returning to the UK. Is it afraid that the mother can’t accept the nude or do you say a lot of personal family scars in the work?

    I think that for performance artists, the body is no longer naked, but a carrier of art. In fact, this is more about my mother’s face. My mother is a soldier. My father is a little punk. It is a waver in the rivers and lakes. She wants to use her love to save a fallen soul. At that time, the mother’s family did not agree with them. After quarreling with the family, the mother rushed out of the house and suffered a car accident causing the uterus to shift, leaving a scar on the lower back. In “Inner of the Vase”, I set up a canal with a water polo. The shape is a map of China. It has nothing to do with politics. It is the shape of the scar on my mother’s lower back.