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  • Fire of Yi People

    November 12, 2018 | Posted By: | blog: film link · Exhibitions · Live Performance · News · Press |




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    Shanghai rouge

    July 10, 2016 | Posted By: | Exhibitions · News |

    Shanghai rouge 💄

    Shang hai  Yun contemporary art center, Conjunctively Evolving – Masters of Contemporary Art in China and Britain,  ( 02/07 – 08/08 2016).

    Curated by Jian Zhou,  li liu and Yichen Zhang.

     

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    Performance Art | Echo Morgan’s Darkness is Undressed in Heartbreaking Performance

    March 10, 2015 | Posted By: | News · Press · reviews |

    Performance Art | Echo Morgan’s Darkness is Undressed in Heartbreaking Performance

    Drawing on her volatile personal history as a child growing up in China, Echo Morgan, whose real name Xie Rong, creates devastatingly emotional performance art. One piece titled Be the Inside of the Vase performed in 2012 at The Royal College of Art in London was based on a conflicting childhood memory. Her mother would tell her “Don’t be a vase, pretty but empty inside, be the inside, be the quality!” while her father would say, “Women should be like vase, smooth, decorative and empty inside!” Beginning with this memory, Morgan pulls the audience deep into her personal history and psyche.

    … …

    The performance is intended to elicit deviance from the audience seen in the fun colored balloons she provides, the drinks in their hand (although probably provided by the venue), and her slow participant-induced undressing. This dark eroticism is present in Morgan’s relationship with her father, at one point even stating “I used to believe that one day…that one day, he would come back, that one day he would rape me.” The audience’s encouragement to undress her at their will is similar to Yoko Ono’s 1965 performance Cut Piece in which Ono placed a pair of scissors in front of her and asked the audience to come forward one-at-a-time to cut off pieces of her clothing. Near the end of the performance a man gets overzealous and begins to cut off large chunks, exposing her nearly-naked body and clearly making Ono unsettled. Both pieces bring the natural deviance within humans to the surface forcing them to address their typically interior feelings in a very public context.

    … …

    Break the Vase begins as a piece about Morgan’s mother and her advice to be “like the inside,” but as the performance is executed it becomes clear that her father is an inescapable character in the narrative. The audience is a metaphor for his persistent abuse towards both Morgan and her mother, but Morgan herself, in the vase, may also be a symbol of him. Morgan’s head sticks out the top of the vase just enough to be struck by the onslaught of balloons, an event that appears to be a strange beheading ritual. From the perspective of the father being both the abuser and the abused, Morgan has cleverly placed him in a fantasy hell of self-inflicted torture.

     


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